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Dr Liddell and Stevie Martin on "Legal Issues in the Early Detection of Cancer"

When Jul 18, 2016
from 10:00 AM to 04:00 PM
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As part of the MRC Cancer Unit's (MRC-CU) Early Detection Research Programme, the LML was asked to complete a preliminary literature review into the legal issues in early detection of cancer. The literature review was prepared by Stevie Martin (Teaching Associate at the Faculty of Law), under the supervision of Dr Liddell.

Dr Liddell will present the literature review at a workshop hosted by the MRC-CU on 18 July 2016 which will also consider the sociological/anthropological and ethical/philosophical issues surrounding early detection. It is hoped that the workshop will identify areas in which the MRC-CU and the LML can work together moving forward. 

Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn on "Revisiting parenthood in the 21st Century"

When Jul 06, 2016 11:25 AM to
Jul 08, 2016 11:25 AM
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Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn

"Revisiting parenthood in the 21st Century"

Culture, Dispute Resolution and the Modernised Family

International Centre for Family Law, Policy and Practice

London

6-8 July 

 

Professor Bartha Knoppers to present "The measured man? Is the time right for a move from genetic testing and biobanking at specific time-points to continuous, real-time monitoring of individuals?"

When Jul 07, 2016
from 04:30 PM to 07:30 PM
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Professor Bartha Knoppers, Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University, will be presenting a seminar at Hughes Hall entitled "The measured man? Is the time right for a move from genetic testing and biobanking at specific time-points to continuous, real-time monitoring of individuals?"

The seminar, delivered as part of the PHG Foundation's Life Sciences and Society Seminars, will explore how this "measured man" approach might affect health systems planning and research, and how it could yield vital new information for personalised healthcare. 

More information, including how to register, is available here

29th Annual Privacy Laws and Business Conference to be held at St John's College Cambridge on 4-6 July 2016

When Jul 04, 2016 09:00 AM to
Jul 06, 2016 03:00 PM
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The 29th Annual Privacy Laws and Business Conference will be held at St John's College Cambridge between 4-6 July 2016.

Dr David Erdos will be chairing three sessions at the Conference, two of which are health-related. In particular, Parallel Session 1 on 5 July is scheduled as follows:

Parallel 1: Health
Chair: Dr. David Erdos, University Lecturer in Law and the Open Society, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge
  
11.50 Connected Health: Risks and overcoming privacy challenges
Nigel Parker, Partner, Allen & Overy, London
Matthew Owens, Global Head Legal, Strategic Partnerships & Digital Medicine, Novartis Pharma, Switzerland
  
12.35 The role of genetic data in personalized medicine and in a changing world
Stefania Tonutti, PhD in Law, New Technologies and Bioethics, University of Bologna, Italy 
  
The programme can be accessed here
  

There is a 20 per cent reduction from academic registration fee at www.privacylaws.com/annual_conference/Register-for-2016-conference/ for anyone with a University of Cambridge, related college or institute e-mail account. Use discount code UofCam and, if you need help, e-mail glenn@privacylaws.com.

 

 

Dr Okeoghene Odudu speaks at 'Taking stock of NHS governance after the 2013 reforms: public procurement, competition and conflict'

When Jun 23, 2016
from 09:00 AM to 05:00 PM
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Dr Okeoghene Odudu speaks at 'Taking stock of NHS governance after the 2013 reforms: public procurement, competition and conflict'. 

The event, hosted by the University of Bristol Law School on 23 June 2016, brings together CCGs, NHS trusts, legal practitioners and academics, so that they can collectively take stock of this aspect of the new NHS governance framework almost three years after its adoption. It aims to explore issues of interaction between public procurement and competition rules in relation to potential conflicts of interest in NHS commissioning. This exploration should allow for the emergence of some initial lessons-learned, as well as help shape research agendas in this area of public governance, which will undoubtedly gain relevance over the coming years.

Through interaction of experts and participants, in particular, the event aims to:

  1. Assess how the sectoral rules created by the National Health Service (Procurement, Patient Choice and. Competition) (No. 2) Regulations 2013 compare with general regimes applicable to conflicts of interest under public procurement and competition law.
  2. Explore the implications for Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and NHS trusts of any potential discrepancies between the sectoral regime and general public procurement and competition rules, with a particular focus on the remedies that can be enforced against them, which in turn determine their operational risks and potential liabilities.
  3. Assess the need for any further reforms of the system once the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 become applicable to health care sector in April 2016.

See here for more information. 

Dr Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan on 'The Protection of Intellectual Property in International Law'

When Jun 23, 2016
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Dr Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan

The Protection of Intellectual Property in International Law

OUP

23 June 2016

 

Synopsis:
  • The first book to comprehensively analyse intellectual property (IP) protection in the wider context of international law.
  • Analytical structure builds on several methodological frameworks to conceptualise norm relations in international law, such as conflict of norms, systems theory and a conflict of laws approach.
  • Takes the perspective of alternative international law systems that function to protect IP, including human rights law and investment law.
  • Considers the approach to IP under international trade, bio-diversity and climate change law, reviewing the different answers these systems offer to legal questions on the protection of IP and how these approaches may be recognised within the international IP system.

 

Mr Colm McGrath on "The Duty to Disclose: How Much Information Is Too Much?"

When Jun 21, 2016
from 06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
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The Duty to Disclose: How Much Information Is Too Much? 

Professor Susan Bewley (Professor of Complex Obstetrics, Kings College London) and Mr Colm McGrath (WYNG Research Fellow in Medical Law & Ethics, Cambridge University) will be speaking at a seminar hosted by the Northern Ireland Forum for Ethics in Medicine and Healthcare on 21 June 2016. The seminar will consider what the Montgomery-v-Lanarkshire case and the duty to disclose means for clinical practice, including:

  • How much information does a woman need in order to enable her to make informed choices about pregnancy and birth?
  • How much information is too much information and how much is not enough?
  • How do health care professionals manage requests for care when a woman has made an informed choice?
  • What happens if the woman’s choice is not the choice that professionals would wish her to make?

The seminar will be held at the Senate Room, Lanyon Building, Queen's University Belfast. 

More information, including how to register, is available here

An Insight into the Patentability and Enforcement of Second Medical Use Patents in the EPO and English Courts Seminar

When Jun 02, 2016
from 02:00 PM to 05:00 PM
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An Insight into the Patentability and Enforcement of Second Medical Use Patents in the EPO and English Courts Seminar

Marks & Clerk LLP, 62-68 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 1LA
2 June 2016 2pm-5pm
 
Jonathon Stafford, Marks & Clerk LLP and Trevor Crosse, Marks & Clerk Solicitors, will be presenting a talk on the patentability and enforcement of second use medical patents in the EPO and English Courts.
 
Topics covered will include:
  • Patentability of second medical use claims at the EPO and the interpretation and enforcement of such claims, including discussion of the decisions that have shaped this area of the law.
  • The standard of evidence required by the EPO in support of second medical use claims, including a review of the origins of the requirement for plausibility / credibility and examples of cases where the necessary standard was, or was not, considered to have been met.
  • The rapid propagation of the requirement for plausibility into all aspects of English patent law, focusing particularly on the sufficiency of second medical use claims and including a discussion of the key English cases that culminated in the recent decision of Carr J in Actavis v Eli Lilly.
  • Where both the EPO and the English courts have arguably gone wrong in relation to the standard of evidence for second medical use claims, the difficulties faced by applicants in knowing when to file, and the practical steps that can be taken to maximise the prospects of obtaining a valid second medical patent.
  • Associated research questions and possibilities for interdisciplinary collaborations across Cambridge (led by Dr Kathy Liddell) 
Refreshments will be provided.
 
Please email ishuckburgh@marks-clerk.com to register your attendance.

Dr Jeffrey Skopek on "Privacy in Numbers?” at Copenhagen

When May 20, 2016
from 03:00 PM to 06:15 PM
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Dr Jeffrey Skopek

"Privacy in Numbers? Biological Bodies of Data, Big Data's Epistemology, and the Legal and Ethical Status of Health Inferences”

Workshop on Legal Dimensions of Big Data in the Health and Life Sciences

University of Copenhagen

20 May 2016

Abstract:

It is often suggested that big data threatens privacy, and that this is especially true in the health context, where all data may soon be health data.  I contend that this common view is mistaken—and that just as we might find truth in numbers, we might find privacy there also.   This analysis consists of three main parts.   First, I argue that big data will bring about an epistemological shift in the nature of scientific knowledge and inquiry, but not in the ways that are often suggested:  rejecting the “end of theory” and “correlation supersedes causation” claims that are often made in the literature, I argue that the real change will be a shift in focus from explanation (and mechanistic causation) to prediction (and difference-making causation).   Second, I identify how this shift will transform the ways in which individuals and their medical traits are known:  in biobank research, for example, the research subject will no longer be translated into a body of data that is disaggregated, studied, and understood, but rather into a body of data that will, in an important dimension, remain opaque to the researcher.   Third, I explore the implications of these developments for privacy, arguing that predictive health algorithms will often not generate the type of justified true beliefs about individuals that are necessary to cause privacy losses—and that even when they do, the predictions will not constitute privacy violations, as they will be mere inferences, which are not the type of epistemic pathway that can violate privacy norms. 

 

Webpage:

http://globalgenes.ku.dk/calender/legal-dimensions-of-big-data/programme/

Dr David Erdos presents at Fordham University School of Law's 'Tenth Law and Information Society Symposium'

When May 13, 2016
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Dr David Erdos was invited to be a panellist/speaker on 'Information Regulation and Freedom of Expression' at the Tenth Law and Information Society Symposium at Fordham University's School of Law on 13 May 2016. 

Information regarding the Symposium can be found here

Professor Di Nicol on "University Material Transfer Agreements: Transfer of Biological Materials and Data for Research"

When May 11, 2016
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Professor Di Nicol

University of Tasmania 

"University Material Transfer Agreements: Transfer of Biological Materials and Data for Research"

11 May 2016

Dr Jeffrey Skopek on "Privacy in Numbers?” at Harvard

When May 06, 2016
from 08:30 AM to 05:30 PM
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Dr Jeffrey Skopek

"Privacy in Numbers? Biological Bodies of Data, Big Data's Epistemology, and the Legal and Ethical Status of Health Inferences”

Conference on Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics

Harvard Law School

6 May 2016

Abstract:

It is often suggested that big data threatens privacy, and that this is especially true in the health context, where all data may soon be health data.  I contend that this common view is mistaken—and that just as we might find truth in numbers, we might find privacy there also.   This analysis consists of three main parts.   First, I argue that big data will bring about an epistemological shift in the nature of scientific knowledge and inquiry, but not in the ways that are often suggested:  rejecting the “end of theory” and “correlation supersedes causation” claims that are often made in the literature, I argue that the real change will be a shift in focus from explanation (and mechanistic causation) to prediction (and difference-making causation).   Second, I identify how this shift will transform the ways in which individuals and their medical traits are known:  in biobank research, for example, the research subject will no longer be translated into a body of data that is disaggregated, studied, and understood, but rather into a body of data that will, in an important dimension, remain opaque to the researcher.   Third, I explore the implications of these developments for privacy, arguing that predictive health algorithms will often not generate the type of justified true beliefs about individuals that are necessary to cause privacy losses—and that even when they do, the predictions will not constitute privacy violations, as they will be mere inferences, which are not the type of epistemic pathway that can violate privacy norms. 

 

Conference webpage:
http://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/2016-annual-conference

Dr David Erdos on "Historic Victory or False Dawn? Analysing the EU Data Protection Regulation"

When Apr 28, 2016
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
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"Historic Victory or False Dawn?  Analysing the EU Data Protection Regulation"

Dr David Erdos 

Thursday 28th April, 5-7pm

Faculty of Law, Room B16

CELS/CIPIL Joint Seminar 

 

This seminar will take a first look at the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) now finally agreed by the European institutions.   Is it a “historic victory” for EU citizens as argued by Viviane Reding - the EU Commissioner responsible for its inception in 2012 - or does it as DIGITALEUROPE suggests fail to “strike the proper balance between protecting citizens’ fundamental rights to privacy and the ability for business in Europe to become more competitive” as well as appropriately reconcile the right to data protection with other fundamental rights?  The talk will argue that, whilst the GDPR will further the EU’s track record of safeguarding individuals in a world of ever accelerating technological threats, it is also likely to both entrench and augment many of its pathologies including a lack of clarity as regards goals, a poor fit with liberal freedoms, an excess of bureaucratic red tape, and a large and growing gap between the law on the books and contemporary digital realities.

Precision Medicine: Legal and Ethical Challenges

When Apr 07, 2016 09:00 AM to
Apr 08, 2016 06:00 PM
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The Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences, 

jointly with the

The Centre for Medical Ethics & Law, The University of Hong Kong,

convene an international conference on 

 

 

Precision Medicine: Legal and Ethical Challenges

Precision medicine promises to revolutionize disease treatment and prevention by capitalizing on personal variation in factors including an individual’s genes, environment and lifestyle.  Genomic and molecular data, for example, can be used to determine predispositions to particular diseases, predict the efficacy and safety of different treatment options, and develop drugs that are targeted to the fundamental biology of diseases rather than their clinical manifestations.   In these and other ways, scientific and technological advances have the potential to bring about an unprecedented increase in the tailoring of medical treatment and health care to the individual characteristics of patients.

In order to realize the full potential of precision medicine, however, we must rethink components of the legal and ethical foundation on which it will be built.  The reason for this is that science is more fluid than the law and ethics with which we hope to shape its development, and our legal and ethical frameworks were built with a very different generation of medical products and practices in mind.  To identify and explore the answers to the challenges that arise from this gap, the world’s experts on these matters will convene at the University of Hong Kong on 7-8 April 2016.

The first day of the conference will be devoted to challenges in the implementation of precision medicine, which will be divided into two categories:

Session 1 will focus on challenges at the level of health care systems, including practical obstacles that arise from the varying systems that different nations build around health care, policy dilemmas caused by attempts to ration access to targeted drugs, and ethical challenges emerging from the changing landscape of health care delivery.

  • Keynote speaker:  Professor Henry Greely (Stanford Law School; Director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences).

 Session 2 will focus on challenges at the level of medical treatment, including questions about the creation and use of predictive analytics in allocating care, the nature and disclosure of individual risks in informed consent, and the breach of duties of confidentiality to protect the health of a patient’s family members.

  • Keynote speaker:  Professor Glenn Cohen (Harvard Law School; Director of the Petrie-Flom Centre for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics).

 The second day of the conference will be devoted to challenges in the development of precision medicine, which will be divided into two categories:

Session 1 will focus on challenges at the level of foundational research, including how to enable research when the necessary biobanks are spread across the world, whether and when to return individual research results and incidental findings to research subjects, and the desirability of using “controlled access” approaches to data sharing.

  • Keynote speaker: Professor Bartha Knoppers (McGill University Faculty of Medicine; Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy).

Session 2 will focus on challenges at the level of translation, including questions about the access and intellectual property policies of publicly funded biobanks, pathways and incentives for diagnostics development, and the benefits and risks of requiring greater clinical trials transparency.

  • Keynote speaker:  Professor Don Chalmers (University of Tasmania Faculty of Law; Director of the Centre for Law and Genetics).

 There will also be grand roundtable discussions for each of the four sessions, allowing for extended conversation and debate amongst the speakers and conference delegates.

 A complete list of the speakers presenting at the conference follows:

  • Don Chalmers (University of Tasmania)
  • Tracy Evans Chan (National University of Singapore)
  • Glenn Cohen (Harvard Law School)
  • Henry Greely (Stanford Law School)
  • Alison Hall (PHG Foundation)
  • Stuart Hogarth (King’s College London)
  • Chih-Hsing Ho (Academia Sinica)
  • Yann  Joly (McGill University)
  • Terry Kaan (University of Hong Kong)
  • Kazuto Kato (Osaka University)
  • Ock-Joo Kim (Seoul National University)
  • Bartha Knoppers (McGill University)
  • Kathy Liddell (University of Cambridge)
  • Colm McGrath (University of Cambridge)
  • Timo Minssen (University of Copenhagen)
  • Jeffrey Skopek (University of Cambridge)
  • Ron Zimmern (PHG Foundation)

For more information and to register...

Mr Colm McGrath on "Liability for Failure to Disclose and the Challenge of Precision Medicine"

When Apr 07, 2016
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Mr Colm McGrath

"Liability for Failure to Disclose and the Challenge of Precision Medicine"

Precision Medicine: Legal and Ethical Challenges

University of Hong Kong

7 April 2016

Abstract:

This paper examines the role of personalised medicine in medical intervention and treatment. It does so by focusing on the law surrounding risk disclosure and securing the patient’s consent to treatment in the UK. This is an area of law which has undergone significant change in the last year following the decision of the UK Supreme Court in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board. That decision, which has introduced uncertainty as to when a clinician ought to offer a particular treatment as an alternative to other suggested treatments, has the potential to greatly influence the availability of some precision treatments in practice in the UK.

Dr Jeffrey Skopek on "Personalized Rationing: The Law and Ethics of Differentiation”

When Apr 07, 2016
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Dr Jeffrey Skopek

"Personalized Rationing: The Law and Ethics of Differentiation”

Precision Medicine: Legal and Ethical Challenges

University of Hong Kong

7 April 2016

 

Abstract:

Some of the greatest challenges that we will face in implementing precision medicine will arise from the ways in which increased precision destabilizes foundational categories and concepts in our law and ethics.  This can be seen in the pharmacogenomic stratification of patient populations, which will give rise to new and difficult questions about the conditions in which an individual patient should be able to differentiate himself from a group of similar patients in order to gain access to a treatment that is not available to the group—and conversely, the conditions in which a patient should be able to resist being differentiated from a group in order to avoid losing access to a treatment.  In this presentation, I will identify and analyze some previously unrecognized challenges concerning the law and ethics of differentiation in this area.   In doing so, I will highlight the fact that advances precision medicine will both benefit and harm patients, moving us closer not only to personalized treatment, but also to personalized rationing.

Dr Kathy Liddell and Dr John Liddicoat on "The Changing IP Landscape for Precision Medicine"

When Apr 07, 2016
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Dr Kathy Liddell and Dr John Liddicoat

"The Changing IP Landscape for Precision Medicine"

Precision Medicine: Legal and Ethical Challenges

University of Hong Kong

8 April 2016

Abstract:

A difficult, but crucial, challenge for the future of precision medicine is to improve the translation of basic genomic science into affordable and widely adopted new treatments. This is essential if genomics is to become, as is widely hoped, an everyday reality in healthcare. One issue is how to raise or recoup funding to meet the significant costs associated with understanding how genetic correlations work in particular individuals in a clinically useful way. This is particularly complex in light of the changing landscape of intellectual property incentives for precision medicine. This presentation focuses on two recent IP developments: (1) the dramatic decrease in the economic strength of DNA-related patents following several landmark rulings by the US Supreme Court (for example, Alice Corp, Myriad and Prometheus); and (2) increasing public attention on the IP and access policies for major biobanks, and associated calls for ‘open innovation’. We will also outline some of the new research questions raised by this changing landscape. For example, in what ways have the patent strategies and business models of precision medicine innovators changed? Are other IP rights taking on greater significance?

"Bioethics and Law" Panel, Harvard Law School

When Mar 29, 2016
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Dr Jeffrey Skopek

Panelist on "Bioethics and Law"
The Future of Health Law and Policy 

Harvard Law School

29 March 2016

 

Access to video from the Conference is available here

Dr Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan on 'Conflict-of-Laws Approach to Competing Rationalities in International Law: The Case of Plain Packaging between IP, Trade, Investment and Health'

When Mar 17, 2016
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Dr Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan

Conflict-of-Laws Approach to Competing Rationalities in
International Law: The Case of Plain Packaging between IP, Trade, Investment and Health

Hanken School of Economics

Helsinki

17 March 2016

Dr Stephanie Palmer on "Assisted Dying: Canadian and UK Legal Approaches"

When Feb 25, 2016
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Canadian Annual Guest Lecture

Leicester Law School

 

Challenges for Evidence in Law and Public Health

When Feb 09, 2016
from 10:30 AM to 04:00 PM
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Challenges for Evidence in Law and Public Health 

Workshop (by invitation)

Date & Time: 9 February 2016 from 10:30am to 4:00pm

Venue: Trinity Hall, Cambridge

 

Public initiatives to promote wider health benefits can have a significant economic impact on powerful corporations. Standardised packaging, alcohol pricing, and sugar warnings are key examples. Increased regulation on health grounds has led to a variety of a number of legal challenges at national, European and international levels, and, in turn, considerable scrutiny of the alleged benefits of public health policies. The scrutiny is particularly intense if the policy interferes with the corporations’ human rights. In this case, the policy must be shown to be "necessary and proportionate for the protection of public health” in order to be lawful.  

These tensions raise a set of interesting and complex questions about public health policy evaluation, clustered around–

  1. information-gathering;
  2. evaluation, including prospective evaluation;
  3. different ways of approaching 'trade-offs';
  4. different ways of approaching evidence or more accurately 'good enough evidence’ so that a policy is (sufficiently) in the public interest; and
  5. different responses to uncertainty and risk (empirical and legal).    

To explore these issues, this workshop will bringing together researchers from a variety of interdisciplinary fields including public health, law, philosophy of science, and risk studies.

Some of the questions to be discussed include –

  • How do courts and lawyers currently think about the requisite 'proof' or 'evidence' that a policy is 'necessary and proportionate for the protection of public health'? What do they mean by 'necessary'? What do they mean by 'proportionate'? How does the law assess whether a public heath measure is appropriate to achieve its stated aim? Could the same result be achieved through less restrictive means?
  • In what way/s do these frameworks change when the proposed public policy challenges corporations’ profit interests without engaging the corporations’  legally-defined ‘human rights’?  For example, this might involve contrasting policies on alcohol pricing/units with standardized packaging affecting property rights in trade marks).
  • How do public health experts currently think about the evidence necessary to say that a public health policy should be implemented? What different schools of thought exist: risk-based approach; rights-based approach; precautionary principle; Nuffield ladder of intervention? Do their views change depending on the target of the policy (e.g. tobacco risks vs obesity risks)? What other factors are relevant to their views?

For the programme, click here.

For the participant list, click here.

James Badenoch QC on "Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?"

When Feb 05, 2016
from 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM
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The 2016 Baron de Lancey Lecture on Medical Law

Mr James Badenoch QC

"Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?"

Date and time: 5 February 2016 at 5:00pm.   A drinks reception will follow at 6:30pm. 

Location:  Room LG18, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge

Registration:   The event is free, but registration is required here.

Media available:  videoaudiophotos

About the speaker: Mr James Badenoch QC was counsel for the successful plaintiff in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11.   He specialises in clinical negligence, medical law, and professional discipline and has appeared in a succession of major cases in the House of Lords, The Privy Council, The Court of Appeal, The High Court, The GMC and The GDC. He is a Bencher of Lincoln’s Inn, a Deputy High Court Judge (since 1994), a President of the Mental Health Review Tribunal (since 1999), a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, Chairman Emeritus of the Expert Witness Institute, and has been a Recorder of the Crown Court (1987-2012).  He took silk in 1989.

 

 

Dr Rumi Yotova on "Regulating Gene Editing: A Comparative Discourse"

When Jan 29, 2016
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Planning for the Future of Gene Editing

Stem Cells & Society Workshop 

Jesus College

Cambridge

Large DNA Bioresources: Goals, Challenges and Proposals Associated with IP and Open Innovation

When Jan 28, 2016
from 02:00 PM to 06:30 PM
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Large DNA Bioresources:

Goals, Challenges and Proposals Associated with IP and Open Innovation

By invitation

Date & Time: 28 January 2016 from 2.00pm to 6.30pm.

Venue: Trinity Hall Cambridge

This workshop --  organised by the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences and the Centre for Science and Policy -- will discuss IP-licensing practices for large synthetic biology (Synbio) and genomic bioresources.  This will follow on from a previous workshop,"Realising Genomic Medicine: Intellectual Property Issues," which was held on 1 May 2015.  The report from that workshop can be downloaded here

Synthetic biology and genomics share an important feature: their development in both academia and commerce depends on the use of large, often publicly funded, bioresources such as BioBricks and the 100,000 Genomes Project. As a result, both fields also share a significant challenge: developing innovation policies for these new resources to ensure that they have real-world impact and become accessible tools for extensive and transformative research. Of crucial importance is how to promote academic research alongside private investment into the translation of technological advances into new products. Integral to any possible solution must be the access and IP policies of bioresources. 

The workshop thus has three aims:  

  • to elicit information, positions and ideas about access and IP practices for large Synbio and genomic bioresources
  • to debate whether, and to what extent, “open science” and “open innovation” are applicable to large Synbio and genomic bioresources
  • to identify opportunities for mid- and long-term policy impact to assist IP policy development in Synbio and genomics.

The workshop will bring together members of the LML and CSaP networks, including policymakers, leading scientists and legal experts from industry, the University of Cambridge and elsewhere. 

Colm McGrath on "The Instability of Patients' Rights"

When Jan 27, 2016
from 06:15 PM to 07:45 PM
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Cambridge Private Law Centre

Work in Progress Seminar

Moot Court Room

Faculty of Law

University of Cambridge

 

Abstract:

The law relating to what risks a medical practitioner must explain to their patient to avoid an action in negligence has recently undergone a significant change following the UK Supreme Court’s decision in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board. The starting point for analysis now focuses on the patient, rather than accepted medical practice relating to disclosure. However, in practice, this new basis for the law has not yet proven to be much of an advance on the previous position. This paper examines two ways in which the basis of the Montgomery decision and its purported scope have proven to be unstable, thus contributing to the stasis. First, Montgomery and later cases will be placed in the broader context of the law relating to patient consent and capacity. This reveals that the capacitous patient is at a disadvantage as compared to the incapacitous patient. Secondly, the paper examines the border between the new Montgomery test and the old Bolam test, defending a broader reading of the former than has so far been applied. This reading is underpinned by a model of the doctor-patient relationship as a continuing, dialogue-based partnership, visible in Montgomery itself. 

 

More information about this event…

Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn publishes paper on “Outsourcing Ethical Dilemmas: Regulating International Surrogacy Arrangements”

When Jan 18, 2016
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Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn

“Outsourcing Ethical Dilemmas: Regulating International Surrogacy
Arrangements” (2016) 24(1) Medical Law Review 59

Dr Rumi Yotova on "The Regulation of Gene Editing Under International Law"

When Jan 07, 2016
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Human Enhancement and the Law: Regulating for the Future

St. Anne's College

Oxford

More information about this event…

Dr Jeffrey Skopek at "Talking Animals, Law and Philosophy"

When Nov 27, 2015
from 03:15 PM to 04:45 PM
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Dr Jeffrey Skopek will offer introductory remarks on animal rights at the first session of the new "Talking Animals, Law and Philosophy" lecture series. 

Professor Michael Bowman (Associate Professor in Law, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nottingham) will give a talk titled "The status of non-human animals: science, philosophy, law."

27 November 2015, 3:15 – 4:45pm

Room G11, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge

Dr David Erdos on "Regulation of Medical Research Under European Data Protection: In Theory and Practice"

When Oct 13, 2015
from 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM
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PHG Foundation Life Sciences & Society Seminar
Hughes Hall, University of Cambridge